Positive reinforcement instead of punishment for children

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It is important to focus on teaching good behavior rather than punishing bad behavior. Research shows that spanking, slapping and other forms of physical punishment don’t work well to correct a child’s behavior. The same holds true for yelling at or shaming a child. Beyond being ineffective, harsh physical and verbal punishments can also damage a child’s long-term physical and mental health.

When your child misbehaves, rewards might be the last thing on your mind. But, positive reinforcement can be one of the most effective behavior modification techniques. You can use positive reinforcement to encourage prosocial behaviors, like sharing or following directions. And, you can use it to prevent misbehavior, like hitting and rule violations.

Positive reinforcement can also be an effective way to encourage and motivate your child to be responsible, do their chores, get along with their siblings, or complete their homework assignments without arguing.

For infants

– Babies learn by watching what you do, so set examples of behavior you expect.- Babies learn by watching what you do, so set examples of behavior you expect.
– Use positive language to guide your baby. For example, say, “Time to sit,” rather than, “Don’t stand.”
– Save the word, “no,” for the most important issues, like safety. Limit the need to say “no” by putting dangerous or tempting objects out of reach.

For toddlers

– Your child is starting to recognize what’s allowed and what isn’t but may test some rules to see how you react. Pay attention to and praise behaviors you like and ignore those you want to discourage. Redirect to a different activity when needed.

– Your child is starting to recognize what’s allowed and what isn’t but may test some rules to see how you react. Pay attention to and praise behaviors you like and ignore those you want to discourage. Redirect to a different activity when needed.

– Tantrums can become more common as your child struggles to master new skills and situations. Anticipate tantrum triggers, like being tired or hungry, and help head them off with well-timed naps and meals.

– Teach your toddler not to hit, bite, or use other aggressive behaviors. Model nonviolent behavior by not spanking your toddler and by handling conflict with your partner in a constructive way.For pre and grade school children

– Preschool-age children are still trying to understand how and why things work and what effect their actions have. As they learn appropriate behavior, expect them to continue testing the limits of parents and siblings.

– Begin assigning age-appropriate chores, like putting their toys away. Give simple, step-by-step directions. Reward them with praise. For teenagers – As your teen develops more independent decision-making skills, you’ll need to balance your unconditional love and support with clear expectations, rules, and boundaries.

– Continue to show plenty of affection and attention. Make time every day to talk. Young people are more likely to make healthy choices if they stay connected with family members.

– Get to know your teen’s friends and talk about responsible and respectful relationships.

– Acknowledge your teen’s efforts, achievements, and success in what they do―and don’t do. Praise the choice to avoid using tobacco, e-cigarettes, alcohol, or other drugs. Set a good example through your own responsible use of alcohol and other substances.

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