How to deal with toddler tantrums

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Toddler tantrums can be frustrating for parents, especially if they happen in public. In this article, you will find out the science behind 2 year olds’ temper tantrums and how to deal with them so that your children won’t keep throwing tantrums again and again.

Why do tantrums happen?

Tantrums can range from whining and crying to screaming, kicking, hitting, and breath holding. They’re equally common in boys and girls and usually happen between the ages of 1 to 3. Some kids may have tantrums often, and others have them rarely. Tantrums are a normal part of child development. They’re how young children show that they’re upset or frustrated. Tantrums may happen when kids are tired, hungry, or uncomfortable. They can have a meltdown because they can’t get something (like a toy or a parent) to do what they want. Learning to deal with frustration is a skill that children gain over time. Tantrums are common during the second year of life, when language skills are starting to develop. Because toddlers can’t yet say what they want, feel, or need, a frustrating experience may cause a tantrum. As language skills improve, tantrums tend to decrease.

How can you stop tantrums?

The easiest way to stop a temper tantrum is to give the child what they want. Obviously, that strategy won’t do you any good in the long run, because your child will constantly go into tantrum mode whenever they want something. The first step in diffusing a temper tantrum is to keep your own temper in check. You’re not going to get anywhere with your child if both of you are screaming at each other. Physically punishing your child is also not a good option, and it will only make the tantrum worse. Take a deep breath, gain control over your emotions, and then discipline your child by calmly but firmly letting them know that tantrums are not acceptable behavior.

Give plenty of positive attention. Get in the habit of catching your child being good. Reward your little one with praise and attention for positive behavior.

Distract your child. Take advantage of your little one’s short attention span by offering something else in place of what they can’t have. Start a new activity to replace the frustrating or forbidden one. Or simply change the environment. Take your toddler outside or inside or move to a different room.

 

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